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Torrinch Island

Loch Lomond, Balloch, G63 0JS

Offers Over £150,000


  • Delightful, unspoilt natural habitat for birds and wildlife

  • Large areas of ancient woodland

  • World famous location

Torrinch Island or the Tower Island is a superb example of natural island beauty at its best. Lying completely untouched and unspoilt for generations, the Island offers a rare opportunity to acquire a stunning oasis that has benefitted from its …

Torrinch Island or the Tower Island is a superb example of natural island beauty at its best. Lying completely untouched and unspoilt for generations, the Island offers a rare opportunity to acquire a stunning oasis that has benefitted from its own natural regeneration.

Lying in Scotland’s largest freshwater loch, Torrinch is one of three islands lying on the Highland Boundary Fault Line within the banks of Loch Lomond. Running from Stonehaven to Kintyre, the highland boundary fault line was formed when the lowland rocks of Scotland collided with those to the north, leaving in its wake what we now know as the Highlands and Lowlands of Scotland. The ground is covered with a mix of lush vegetation, ancient woodland and impressive rock formation which have all been extensively cared for with the help of Scottish Natural Heritage. Ranging from honey-suckle garlanded Oaks, Aspen, Alders and Scots Firs, Torrinch Island provides a range of ancient woodland spanning the entirety of its 18 acres. Encapsulated by the dramatic topography, Torrinch Island get its name from the sheer face of
conglomerate rock which soars 100 feet above the level of Loch Lomond at the south west corner of the Island and slopes away gently to the north-east shore.

Surrounded in every direction by spectacular mountain ranges, with Scotland’s most southerly Munro, Ben Lomond, casting a watchful eye over the entirety of the Loch, Torrinch Island forms part of the wider Scottish National Nature Reserve which is supported by its SSSI (Site of Special Scientific Interest) status. With no record of the Island ever being inhabited, Torrinch has remained untouched and undisturbed for over 100 years allowing for the creation of one of the most fruitful and picturesque Islands on Loch Lomond to date.

The immediate area is well suited to the outdoor enthusiast being within the boundary of the Loch Lomond and Trossachs National Park. There is a large range of recreational pursuits including water sports such as canoeing, kayaking and windsurfing all offered on Loch Lomond and Loch Long, the Loch Lomond Sailing Club is located to the north of the Loch with organised races throughout the year. There are also land based activities such as walking and cycling with the aforementioned Ben Lomond to the south, the Arrochar Alps situated to the west, and at the head of Loch Long, there are five Munros and a range of Corbetts.

There are excellent fishing opportunities nearby for salmon, sea trout, brown trout and coarse fishing for both fly and trawled fishing.

Torrinch Island lies between Creinch and Inchcailloch Island in the southern area of Loch Lomond. The village of Balmaha to the east stands to provide the easiest point of access from the mainland to the Island and delivers a selection of local amenities including the Macfarlane and Son Boatyard which currently runs a ferry service to the neighbouring Inchcailloch. The larger populations of Helensburgh and Alexandria allow for a wider range of amenities and services, all within 25 miles of Balmaha. Scotland’s largest City, Glasgow is 21 miles to the south east with world renowned shopping outlets, businesses and entertainment.
Glasgow Airport is within an hour’s drive (25 miles) from Balmaha and offers regular flights to London and a wide range of international destinations.