Under offer

Glenlochay

By Killin, Perthshire, FK21 8UB
Offers Over
£4,200,000
Farmhouse with 2 reception rooms, 2 bedrooms
Annexe to farmhouse requiring upgrading
3 cottages and 2 bothies
Productive livestock farming enterprise
In-bye and hill ground
Exciting deer stalking with 5 year average of 44 stags and 26 hinds
Potential walked up grouse shooting
5.5 miles double bank salmon fishing rights on the River Lochay
Brown trout fishing on two lochans
1,306 acres recently planted native woodlands providing significant income stream
Potential low ground shoot

SITUATION
Glenlochay Estate lies in a spectacular setting amidst some of Highland Perthshire's finest scenery at the head of Glenlochay. Although secluded Glenlochay is highly accessible, with the attractive village of Killin being some 8 miles to the east and providing a good range of day-to-day facilities including a primary school, bank, post office, supermarket and doctor's surgery as well as a number of hotels. There are more extensive services available at both Aberfeldy, some 29 miles to the north-east and Crieff some 34 miles to the south-east. Perth and Stirling can both be reached in just over an hour by car. There are railway stations at Pitlochry (43 miles) and Stirling (45 miles) with regular services to both the north and south including overnight sleeper trains to London. The international airports of Glasgow and Edinburgh can be reached in approximately an hour and half, providing flights to UK, continental and international destinations.

Perthshire has an unusually high number of private day and boarding schools including Ardvreck and Morrison's Academy (both in Crieff). Glenlochay Estate lies within the catchment area for Killin Primary School and McLaren High School in Callander.

In addition to the sport currently available on the estate, there are a wide range of recreational opportunities in the locality. These include hill walking, winter sports at Glencoe to the west and a number of delightful golf courses nearby. Water sports may also be enjoyed on Loch Earn which includes a sailing club.

HISTORICAL NOTE
Glenlochay is steeped in ancient Scottish clan history and was formerly part of the extensive estates of the Earl of Breadalbane. The famous Gaelic poet, Duncan Ban MacIntyre, immortalised Glenlochay in one of his best known poems "Song to Coire a Cheathaith". It is believed that as a forester to the Earl of Breadalbane, he occupied the estate's Batavaime Bothy and kept an eye on the once Royal ancient deer forest of Mamlorn. The Forest of Mamlorn, which formed part of Glenlochay, was famed at one time as being one of Scotland's most prolific and spectacular deer forests and indeed it is said that the famous Scotsman, Robert the Bruce, roamed here as a fugitive following his defeat by Alistair MacDougall of Lorne at the battle of Methven in 1306. Bruce subsequently defeated the MacDougalls at the Battle of the Brander Pass in 1308.

DESCRIPTION
Glenlochay Estate lies in one of Scotland's most beautiful glens. It extends to some 12,816 acres and offers privacy, seclusion and vast areas for deer stalking or walking while being within easy travelling distance of Edinburgh and Glasgow. Winding through the centre of the estate is the River Lochay. Kenknock Farmhouse, steadings and cottage, together with Badour Cottages and Batavaime Bothy all lie on the northern side of the river and enjoy outstanding southerly views.

The lands of Glenlochay comprise in-bye and hill ground rising from 490 feet (150m) above sea level alongside the River Lochay to 3363 feet (1025m) at the summit of Ben Challum. An important conservation programme, comprising the planting of 11 new native woodland blocks known as 'The Forest of Mamlorn Project', was undertaken between 2011 and 2015 and extends to some 1,306 acres, with older pockets of woodland providing further shelter and variety to the landscape. Projected grant aid of £373,243 is payable between 2019 and 2030 to maintain these forests.

The estate runs a productive, principally sheep farming enterprise (2400 ewes and gimmers), together with a small herd of cattle (59 cows) with a good range of buildings at the core of the estate and further useful, outlying buildings.

Glenlochay, at one time, formed part of one of Scotland's most prolific and spectacular deer forests and during the 1970's carried an excess of 1,500 hinds. It is a member of the Breadalbane Deer Management Group and currently has a five year average of 44 stags and 26 hinds. All the beats are readily accessible, initially by a 4x4 vehicle from the estate roads and further out by Argocat. The ground is varied and provides exciting, challenging stalking. The sport at Glenlochay is further enhanced by approximately 5.5 miles of double bank and 1.8 miles of single bank salmon and sea trout fishing rights on the River Lochay. Other activities include brown trout fishing on two lochans and the potential for shooting the odd walked up grouse.

The residential component of the estate includes the following:

Kenknock Farmhouse
Believed to be a former Drovers Inn, Kenknock Farmhouse is a traditional farmhouse with a harled exterior under a principally pitched slated roof. Lying to the immediate south east of the steading range, it enjoys an elevated position overlooking the River Lochay and the glen. It is currently occupied under a service occupancy by the head shepherd.

The accommodation, over two floors, comprises:

Ground floor: Hall, dining room, breakfasting kitchen, sitting room,

First floor: Two bedrooms, box room and family bathroom.

Attached to Kenknock Farmhouse is an annex which is currently in poor order and not inhabited. It is however wind and water tight and could provide further accommodation to the principal house, subject to obtaining the necessary consents to improve it.

A lawned garden, with parking area, lies to the front of the house with a further gravelled area to the rear.

West Kenknock Cottage
West Kenknock Cottage lies on the western side of the steading range. It is of Doran construction with a harled exterior of concrete walls under a tiled roof. It is currently occupied under a service occupancy by the under shepherd.

The accommodation comprises:
Hall, kitchen, sitting room, three bedrooms, bathroom.

There is a garden down to grass surrounding West Kenknock Cottage.

Badour Cottages
Badour Cottages are situated in a quiet and peaceful setting at the foot of the Allt Badour burn, some 3 miles to the west of Kenknock Farmhouse and they enjoy far reaching views. They comprise a pair of semi-detached cottages with a harled exterior under a recently re-slated roof with new double glazed windows. The cottages are reached by a hardcore track with a parking area lying to the front. They have been unoccupied for a number of years and would benefit from renovation and refurbishment.
They are serviced by an electricity supply from a diesel generator in the outbuilding.

Each cottage currently provides the following accommodation:

Porch, hall, open-plan kitchen with living room, two bedrooms, bathroom, integral store.

A useful outbuilding of harled brick construction under a corrugated roof with concrete floor lies to the immediate north-west of the cottages.

Badour Bothy
Lying to the south of Badour Cottages is a derelict former bothy of stone construction under a slated roof, with an area of garden ground lying immediately to the north of the cottages enclosed by a stone wall.

Batavaime Bothy
Batavaime Bothy lies in a stunning and elevated position, about a mile to the west of Badour Cottages. It commands outstanding views over Ben Challum to the west and down Glen Lochay to the east. It is of stone construction under a slated roof with the accommodation comprising:

Open-plan sitting room/dining room, kitchen, bedroom, storeroom.

New shooting lodge
Planning permission was previously applied for by the previous owner to Stirling Council in 2006 for a new shooting lodge with stalker's/shepherd's accommodation and outbuildings together with a deer larder. The planning application was withdrawn. The proposed location for the new lodge was close to Batavaime Bothy. It is thought likely that the Planning authorities would look favourably on a formal planning application for a new lodge but interested parties must make their own enquiries about this.

FARM AND ESTATE BUILDINGS
The farm and estate buildings are principally to the immediate west of Kenknock Farmhouse. They comprise the following:

Kenknock Steading Range:

General purpose shed 1
42.2m x 21m (138ft x 69ft)
"Algo" shed of steel portal framed construction extending to 7 bays with concrete block walls and vented box profile cladding above, hardcore floor. Part fitted internally with sheep pens. Electricity and water.

General purpose shed 2
36.6m x 29.8m (118ft x 98ft)
"Dale" shed of steel portal frame construction extending to 8 bays with concrete block walls and Yorkshire space board cladding above, corrugated roof and part hardcore/part concrete floor with part fitted internally with cattle court. Electricity and water.

Timber kennels
There are 6 timber kennels with runs lying to the south of General Purpose Shed 1 with a further four timber kennels to the north of West Kenknock Cottage.

To the immediate north west of the General Purpose Shed 1 is a sheep fank together with cattle handling facilities.

Lying to the east of the steading range and accessed by a road that runs along the north bank of the River Lochay is:

Sheep Shed
60m x 30m (196ft x 98ft)
"Algo" sheep shed extending to 10 bays of steel portal frame construction with concrete and timber walls and profile sheet roof. 3 raised central feed passages. Continuous flow water system.

To the west of the Kenknock steading range lies:

Stock handling shed
Recently constructed "Woods" shed with timber and box profile walls and box profile roof with earth floor and open fronted.

Approximately 2.5 miles to the west of Kenknock Farmhouse and accessed by the estate track lies:
Sheep fank
Constructed of corrugated iron with concrete floor and partly covered.

Sheep Shed
60m x 30m (196ft x 98ft)
"Algo" sheep shed extending to 10 bays of steel portal frame construction with concrete and timber walls and profile sheet roof. 3 raised central feed passages. Continuous flow water system.

To the west of the Kenknock steading range lies:
Stock handling shed
Recently constructed "Woods" shed with timber and box profile walls and box profile roof with earth floor and open fronted.

Approximately 2.5 miles to the west of Kenknock

Farmhouse and accessed by the estate track lies:
Sheep fank
Constructed of corrugated iron with concrete floor and partly covered.

LAND
The land at Glenlochay extends to approximately 12,816 acres (5,186 ha) in total. It is classified 5.1 to 7 by the James Hutton Institute for Soil Research. For IACS purposes much of the land is designated as rough grazings however there are some useful in-bye enclosures extending to about 80 acres by the Kenknock Steading range.

The farm at Glenlochay is run in hand by two shepherds. It is predominately a sheep enterprise of 2400 Blackface and Blackface/Swaledale cross ewes/gimmers grazing on the 7 Glenlochay hirsels. In addition there is a beef suckler herd of 59 Luing/beef Short Horn cross cattle.

The current stocking is as follows:

Sheep
2,447 Ewes and gimmers
650 Ewe hogs
278 Lambs
78 Tups
19 6-24 month cattle

Cattle
59 Cows
4 Bulls
8 Heifers
1 Bullock
1 0-6 month cattle

The farmland is all designated as being in Payment Region 3 and the land is designated as being in the Less Favoured Area (Severely Disadvantaged C) and therefore is eligible for subsidy claims under the Less Favoured Area Support Scheme.

WOODLAND
The woodlands at Glenlochay comprise potentially valuable and attractive plantations. Under 'The Forest of Mamlorn Project' undertaken by the current owner, eleven native woodland blocks were planted between 2011 and 2015, principally native broadleaves with some Scot's pine, with grant aid from the Scottish government. It has taken its name from the ancient Forest of Mamlorn that once straddled part of Glenlochay Estate.

A total of 1,306 acres of woodland have been planted over this four year period. The woodland grant due to be paid to the estate from 2019 to 2030 is a total of £373,243. Further information is available from the selling agent.

In the event a purchaser does not wish to take on the responsibility of maintaining these woodlands until the end of the contract period in 2029, the vendor will be happy to continue to do so in which case he will retain the unexhausted grant income stream.

Compartment schedule of recently planted woodland blocks - further information available in brochure.

In addition to the newly planted woodland blocks there are further pockets of established woodland blocks providing shelter.

CARBON CREDITS
The carbon credits arising from the woodland creation project will be retained by the seller.

STALKING
The dramatic topography of Glenlochay Estate, from the lower slopes to the high tops including the four peaks of Beinn Cheathaich, Meall Glas, Beinn nan Imirean and Beinn Challum, provides a varied and exciting days stalking for two rifles. In addition to the four peaks there are three corries making up the western section of the estate providing good grazings and shelter for the red deer. There are six beats in all, enabling a number of rifles. Deer are removed from the hill by a combination of Argocat and quad bike.

Glenlochay Estate is part of the Breadalbane Deer Management Group, through which the estates cooperate to ensure a reasonable and sustainable population of deer is maintained.

The recent records are detailed in the brochure.

For the 2016/17 season, the estate entered a Section 7 Deer Management Agreement to reduce the stag cull from 65 to 12. It has now withdrawn from this agreement.

Following the recent woodland planting, roe deer are now being seen quite regularly on the estate and there is undoubtedly potential to establish a small low ground shoot.

GROUSE SHOOTING
In addition to the stalking, the hills of Glenlochay offer the potential for walked up grouse shooting on the Kenknock, Badour and Beinn Cheathaich, while ptarmigan can be found on the highest peaks.

FISHING
The estate enjoys salmon and sea trout fishings rights on the River Lochay, which runs through the centre of the property from the west to the east along the valley bottom and provides a highly scenic setting in which to cast a fly. There are 5.5 miles of double bank and 1.8 miles of single bank salmon and sea trout fishings. The river is considered an important spawning river and as part of the ongoing improvement works carried out by the Tay Salmon Fisheries Board, approximately 75,000 smolts are released annually into the river and this programme is set to continue. Angling activity has been low in recent years and no formal fishings records are available.

Brown trout fishing can be enjoyed on Lochan Chailein to the south west of the estate and Lochan Learg nan Lunn to the north west, both of which have a good stock of wild brown trout.

HYDRO POTENTIAL
It is considered that there is perhaps potential for a hydro scheme up to 250kW. Further information is available from the selling agents.

GENERAL REMARKS AND INFORMATION
FARMCODE
716/0009

BASIC PAYMENT SCHEME
The Basic Payment Entitlement was established on 15th May 2015. The Basic Payment Entitlements will be available for sale by separate negotiation. Further details of the Basic Payment Entitlement is available from the Selling Agent.

Any payments relating to the 2017 scheme year will, if appropriate, be retained by the Seller. If applicable, the purchaser(s) will be responsible upon occupation of the subjects of sale to comply fully with the Statutory Management requirements to maintain the farmland in Good Agricultural and Environmental Condition (GAEC) as laid down under the Cross Compliance rules of the Basic Payment Scheme (BPS) 2016 for the remainder of the scheme year.

LESS FAVOURED AREA SUPPORT SCHEME (LFASS)
The land at Glenlochay is eligible for Less Favoured Area Support and any payment by SGRIPD relating to the current farming year will be retained by the Seller.

ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGNATIONS
Within the subjects of Glenlochay Estate is one Special Site of Scientific Interest (SSSI) and one Special Area of Conservation. Further information is available from the selling agents.

SERVITUDE RIGHTS, BURDENS, WAYLEAVES AND STATUTORY PUBLIC AND OTHER ACCESS RIGHTS
The property is sold subject to and with the benefit of all existing servitude and wayleave rights, including rights of access and rights of way, whether public or private. The property is also sold subject to the rights of public access under the Land Reform (Scotland) Act 2003. The purchaser(s) will be held to have satisfied themselves as to the nature of all such servitude rights and others following their solicitors' examination of the title deeds.

Scottish and Southern Energy (SSE) own small areas of ground within the boundary of Glenlochay Estate on which lies a water pipe and tunnel aqueducts. SSE have formal rights of access over specific parts of Glenlochay for the purpose of accessing their owned areas of ground.

There are further third party rights of access over the estate. Further information is available from the selling agents.

INGOING VALUATION
The purchaser(s) of Glenlochay, in addition to the purchase price, will be obliged to take over and pay for at a valuation to be agreed between two valuers, one acting for each party, or an arbiter appointed by the valuers, or failing agreement as to the appointment by the President, for the time being, of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (Scottish Branch), the following:
1. All oils, fuel, wood and sundries at cost.
2. Any estate equipment
3. Sheep at hefted value and cattle.

Note: If the amount of the valuations has not been agreed on the date fixed for completion, then the purchaser shall pay to the seller such a sum as Galbraith shall certify on account at the valuation pending agreement. Should the payment not be made within seven days then the interest will become payable on outstanding monies at 5% over Bank of Scotland borrowing rate.

MINERAL RIGHTS AND TIMBER
The mineral rights are included in the sale. All standing and fallen timber is included in the sale.

SPORTING RIGHTS
The sporting rights are in hand.

EMPLOYEES
The purchaser will be obliged to continue to the employment of the estate staff. The two members of staff currently employed by the estate will be subject to the Transfer of Undertakings Protection of Employment (TUPE) regulations. Further details of the employees and their terms and conditions will be made available following receipt of a formal note of interest.

Details of Services and Council Tax may be found in the brochure.

POSTCODE
FK21 8UB

VIEWING
Strictly by appointment with Galbraith. Given the potential hazards of a working estate, we request you take care when viewing the property, especially around the agricultural buildings, unoccupied buildings, farmland and water courses.

DIRECTIONS
From Stirling take the A84 north signposted to Callander. After passing through Callander continue on the A84 to Killin. On reaching Killin travel through the village and after about ¾ mile and crossing a stone bridge turn immediate left onto a minor road. Continue on this minor road for about 8 miles and the entrance to Glenlochay Estate is reached.
From Perth take the A85 west through Crieff and Comrie. Continue on the A85 to Killin. On reaching Killin travel through the village and after about ¾ mile and crossing a stone bridge turn immediate left onto a minor road. Continue on this minor road for about 8 miles and the entrance to Glenlochay Estate is reached.

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