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Blacket House

Eaglesfield, Lockerbie, Dumfries, South West Scotland, DG11 3AA

Offers Over £1,250,000


  • Living Room, Drawing Room, Dining Room, Study, Kitchen Breakfast Room, Office, Utility Room

  • 5 Double en suite bedrooms plus further 2 attic bedrooms

  • Lawned Gardens and Woodland

  • Two Excellent General Purpose Agricultural Buildings

  • Wood Fuelled Bio-Mass Heating System

  • Ruinous former Coach House and Stables

  • Edge of Village Location

Description
Blacket House is an impressive Country House with up to 75 acres available of grazing ground and woodland set close to the quiet village of Eaglesfield, a peaceful and private property in a highly accessible location for local towns …

Description
Blacket House is an impressive Country House with up to 75 acres available of grazing ground and woodland set close to the quiet village of Eaglesfield, a peaceful and private property in a highly accessible location for local towns and the M74/M6.

Blacket House is approached through a gated entrance along a private tarmac drive flanked by mature trees with its own fields on either side arriving at the front of the house with a large gravel parking area to the front and side of the house and Lawned gardens.

A 19th Century Georgian House, Blacket House is built from traditional red sandstone under slate roof, Hardwood sash windows with the original working shutters. A central front door leads through the vestibule into the main hallway from which you will find the doors to 4 reception rooms and a beautiful staircase leading to 5double bedrooms each with their own en suite facilities, and stairs to a further 2bedrooms. There is also access from the hallway to the cellar and storage area. Blacket House has a well-appointed kitchen/breakfast room with oil fired Aga and spacious office, utility and cloakroom areas with doors leading out to an enclosed courtyard.

The house can be heated by the recently installed wood fuelled bio-mass boiler heating system which provides a Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) income of around£500 per month, alternatively, the oil boiler system can be used.

Gardens & Grounds
The lawned gardens are surrounded by mature trees and established borders with a variety of shrubs and plants, Blacket Tower, the ancestral home of the last known chief of the Bell Clan sits proudly in the grounds. From the gardens, access to the fields leads to the River the Kirtle Waters which runs to the south of the house providing the opportunity to fish for Trout with the Doctor’s pool, behind the house being a well-recognised lie for fish. To the south-West of the house along a concrete drive are 2 agricultural buildings suitable for a variety of uses, one of which houses the bio-mass heating system.

Farmland description
The land at Blacket House extends to about 60 acres of farm land divided into 9enclosures, and is all down to grass with all the fields having either mains troughs or natural water. The land is in excellent heart having been re-seeded in recent years and close grazed by a pedigree sheep flock. Many of the boundaries are double fenced and recently planted with hedges with some native broad leaf trees. There are also approximately 12 acres of mature woodland areas.

HISTORICAL NOTE
Sitting within the grounds of Blacket House is Blacket Tower which is a scheduled ancient monument dating from the 16th Century. The tower was a fortified defensive tower and home to the Clan Bell. The Clan Bell’s last recognised chief, William Redcloak Bell died in 1628. The Bells were well known as one of the most famous names amongst the Border Reiver families in the buffer zone between Scotland and England that for over 700 years until 1745 had never had 50 consecutive years of peace.

It was also the home of Richard Bell who in the mid-16th century was the official suitor of “Fair Helen Irvine” the daughter of the Laird of Kirkconnel the neighbouring estate.

The tragic story of how she died at the hands of Bell when she tried to defend her lover Adam Fleming of Kirkpatrick took a firm hold of local folklore and became the subject of several ballads over the centuries. These include Fair Helen of Kirkconnel Lea, and was also used as the source for Eaglesfield Smith’s most famous poem, William and Helen, published in his book Legendary Tales in 1806.

The present house is a small mansion house which was designed for the owner Eaglesfield Smith by the famous Dumfries architect, Walter Newall. It was built in about 1835 and remains little altered.