A leading independent property consultancy with expertise covering a broad spectrum of property related services

Elegant Country Property, Former Home of Arthur Bell, Entrepreneur and Conservationist

Galbraith is bringing to the market Newholm of Culter, the beautiful former home of the entrepreneur Arthur Bell CBE, and his family.

 

Arthur Bell, the charismatic food and drink entrepreneur and political figure was a pioneer of computerised direct marketing, and gourmet food by post.

He was once sued by Guinness for provocatively signing his name on bottles of rare whisky. He deliberately sought to create confusion with Bell’s Whisky, in protest at Guinness strategically buying then closing many traditional distilleries, and famously won the case against the corporate giant, which sent English lawyers to fight the case, although it was heard under Scots law.

In addition, Bell’s tireless championing of the restoration of New Lanark, transformed the derelict industrial mills into a major tourist attraction, employer, and Unesco World Heritage site. Over a period of 40 years he led the voluntary work to restore the village, ultimately resulting in the accolade.

Arthur Bell worked with heritage architect David Willis to design Newholm of Culter, creating a unique family home filled with light. The panoramic garden views from the house are a superlative feature, giving a sense of living within and surrounded by nature, due to the extensive glazing at the rear.

Polly Cregan said: “This beautifully designed modern house provides generous and versatile accommodation, ideal for entertaining, accompanied by wonderful gardens and grounds. Its location, in the conservation village of Coulter and surrounded by scenic countryside, ensures a superb rural lifestyle yet the house is within comfortable commuting distance of Edinburgh and Glasgow.”

The house has five bedrooms (three en-suite), a superb galleried drawing room, two further reception rooms, breakfasting kitchen, separate utility room, two home offices, and family bathroom.

The grounds at Newholm of Culter are a particular attraction, extending to just over three acres and providing year-round interest and privacy. There are areas of lawn, a beautiful small arboretum, and a more formal garden, interspersed with mown paths and bordered by a mature beech hedge on the eastern boundary. Currently the gardens produce a rich variety of organic fruit and vegetables and fresh herbs.

In addition there is a meadow which could be used as a paddock, extending to about 0.8 acres and enclosed by fencing. Outbuildings include a brick-built row of stables, incorporating a tack room and five stalls plus an open timber store. There is also a polytunnel.

Newholm of Culter is set back from the road on the northern fringes of Coulter, a conservation village in South Lanarkshire.

Neighbouring Culter House is a 17th century listed building (1668), which hosted Bonnie Prince Charlie during the Jacobite uprising. Arthur Bell with his entrepreneur wife Susan Bell, and their four children. lived at Culter House for 20 years before and during the construction of Newholm of Culter.

The village of Coulter benefits from a primary school and is known for its traditional architecture and mature trees. The market town of Biggar, less than three miles away, offers a range of local services as well as independent shops, cafes, restaurants and hotels.

The property, whilst being in a lovely rural location, is very accessible and within comfortable commuting distance of Edinburgh, Glasgow and Carlisle.

Newholm Of Culter is for sale through Galbraith for a guide price of £750,000.

NOTE - ARTHUR BELL CBE

Arthur Bell CBE was a charismatic food and drink entrepreneur and political figure who pioneered computerised direct marketing, and gourmet food by post, and led the restoration of a World Heritage Site from ruin as Chairman of New Lanark. Arthur worked with heritage architect David Willis on restorations at New Lanark then latterly to design a unique family home (Newholm of Culter) filled with light, with extraordinary architectural proportions, and intimately connected to its impressive kitchen gardens. The panoramic garden views from the house are a superlative feature, giving a sense of living within and surrounded by nature, due to the extensive glazing at the rear.

Neighbouring Culter House is a 17th century listed building (1668), which hosted Bonnie Prince Charlie during the Jacobite uprising. Arthur Bell moved to Newholm from next door, having lived in Culter House from 1982 to 2002, with his wife the entrepreneur Susan Bell, and their four children.

 

Arthur Bell was once sued by Guinness for provocatively signing his name on bottles of rare whisky. He put the bottles up for sale in protest at Guinness strategically buying then closing many traditional distilleries, and famously won the case against the corporate giant who sent English lawyers to fight the case, which was heard under Scots law.