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A9 Property Owners Urged To Protect Their Interests As Roadbuilders Plan Next Compulsory Purchases Round

Property owners near one of Scotland's biggest transport infrastructure projects could miss out on substantial compensation or lose the opportunity to mitigate its impact unless they act early. 

Transport Scotland is preparing to issue a series of draft  compulsory purchase orders (CPOs) to enable work to proceed on the Glen Garry to Dalwhinnie section of the A9. The Highland road is being upgraded to link Inverness with the Central Belt and open up areas along the route for economic development.

The 3bn modernisation programme by Transport Scotland inevitably involves CPOs and the latest are due to be published on 19 December.

For anyone affected by this section of the project it is likely too late to reduce the impact of the scheme.  However, those with land on or near the A9 who are potentially affected by future sections of the dualling are urged to consider the possible effects of the work at an early stage in the programme to ensure their views and concerns can be fully taken into account and to ensure any loss is properly compensated, according to Mike Reid, Head of Utilities at Galbraith, who said:

While it may be tempting to ignore what you can't see, prompt and thorough consideration of plans at a very early stage is imperative for anyone with property that may be affected. This applies not just to those near the road itself, but also to those potentially affected by engineering support works or access routes, which may be a considerable distance away from the actual dual carriageway.

Property owners and occupiers have a legal obligation to mitigate any losses in the event of a CPO but that doesn't mean you can't take a proactive approach to protecting your long-term property rights and values. Mike Reid added:

It will probably be too late to influence Transport Scotland when you've already received your draft CPO notice without going to the expense of a public enquiry.

The A9 programme will upgrade 80 miles of road from single to dual carriageway to deliver economic growth through improved road safety and reliable and quicker journey times, as well as better links to pedestrian, cycling and public transport facilities. Inverness is currently the only UK city without access to dual carriageway.